Physicists Turn the Cheerios Effect Inside Out 

We’ve all noticed how those last few Cheerios in the cereal bowl seem to cluster together in the center and along the edges. It’s called the “Cheerios effect.” Now an international team of physicists has discovered a reverse Cheerios effect. They described their results in a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Are your biggest security threats on the inside?

The now infamous Ashley Madison website has had a pretty successful run at helping its clientele be disloyal. So perhaps some would view it as poetic justice if the website became one of the most scandalous breaches in history at the hands of one of its own. 

At least that is the conclusion of IT security analyst John McAfee, who noted recently “yes, it is true. Ashley Madison was not hacked – the data was stolen by a woman operating on her own who worked for Avid Life Media.” 

If true, the fact that the Ashley Madison breach was due to an internal, and not external, threat shouldn’t come as too big a surprise. Many IT security studies this year have pointed to the growing threat of insider data theft and corporate breaches. 

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Intel Is Putting Its Promising Skylake CPUs Inside Smartphones

Intel’s new Skylake processors fit inside practically any computer. Soon, you’ll be able to get one inside a PC-on-a-stick . But it turns out that Core M computers can get even smaller still. Intel says it’s already testing the new processors inside smartphones too.

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Cyborgs, third ears and body hacking: How the future of technology is inside us

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Science fiction is full of stories in which the machines take over and humans are left subservient to their own creations, but according to some artists and experimenters, that need not be our future.

The work of Neil Harbisson, an Irish-born human cyborg, and Stelarc, an Australian performance artist, suggest that if we unite our bodies with technology, we can drastically extend our abilities and perception, and maybe even stay one step ahead of the robots.

Appearing at a Queensland University of Technology’s robotics event, Robotronica, on Sunday, the pair told Mashable Australia why body hacking could offer us a different, evolved future. Read more…

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